WEEK THREE: BEACH VIBES

PHOTO NUMBER TWENTY-ONE

 Do you ever look out at the ocean and realize how incredibly small you are? We are just a blip in the universe, yet our worries always seem so large. It is in places like this that I find myself contemplating what the meaning of life is. For as long as humans have existed, this is the question that has never been answered.    Who are we? What are we doing here? Are we the only ones that exist? Am I supposed to be doing something that matters? What happens if I never find my calling?   Sometimes, I am overwhelmed by these types of thoughts. What if I never reach my full potential? What if I never amount to anything at all? I struggle with the way society is today. I try not to be materialistic. If I had it my way, I would have up and left a long time ago. I want to explore the world and the people in it. I want to see all that nature has to offer. I want to understand who I am as a person and learn what my job on this earth is. Despite all of this, I continue to find myself chained to the materialistic mindset of the world. It costs money to travel. As much as I want to believe that I can run off into the sunset without a care in the world and that the rest will fall into place, I know that isn't realistic. I struggle with the idea that there are certain milestones I have to complete before I can move into the next phase of my life. I need to find a steady job so that I can support myself. I need to obtain my degree. I need to learn what it means to truly be on my own.   I love the ocean because it is so simple. It does as it is supposed to. There are no questions and no hesitations. It knows exactly how it is supposed to behave, yet the tide is still subject to the will of the moon. I hope that with practice, I can stop questioning myself. I hope that one day I will know who I am and why I am here, but for now, I will keep asking questions. 

Do you ever look out at the ocean and realize how incredibly small you are? We are just a blip in the universe, yet our worries always seem so large. It is in places like this that I find myself contemplating what the meaning of life is. For as long as humans have existed, this is the question that has never been answered. 

Who are we? What are we doing here? Are we the only ones that exist? Am I supposed to be doing something that matters? What happens if I never find my calling?

Sometimes, I am overwhelmed by these types of thoughts. What if I never reach my full potential? What if I never amount to anything at all? I struggle with the way society is today. I try not to be materialistic. If I had it my way, I would have up and left a long time ago. I want to explore the world and the people in it. I want to see all that nature has to offer. I want to understand who I am as a person and learn what my job on this earth is. Despite all of this, I continue to find myself chained to the materialistic mindset of the world. It costs money to travel. As much as I want to believe that I can run off into the sunset without a care in the world and that the rest will fall into place, I know that isn't realistic. I struggle with the idea that there are certain milestones I have to complete before I can move into the next phase of my life. I need to find a steady job so that I can support myself. I need to obtain my degree. I need to learn what it means to truly be on my own. 

I love the ocean because it is so simple. It does as it is supposed to. There are no questions and no hesitations. It knows exactly how it is supposed to behave, yet the tide is still subject to the will of the moon. I hope that with practice, I can stop questioning myself. I hope that one day I will know who I am and why I am here, but for now, I will keep asking questions. 

Audrey Dawson